The “Sapling” Has A Different Root

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Murder of Aurelie Chatelain: reconstruction in Villejuif with Ghlam

A friend recently sent me an article by Matthieu Suc from March 23, 2016, that I had somehow missed.  Entitled “The terrorist networks of the Islamic state (2/3): the chain of command leading to the attacks,” it details the background stories of a few of the major figures involved in organizing attacks in France and Belgium.  One of them, the least well known by far of the group, is related to the fifth article I ever wrote for my blog.  His name is Abdelnacer Benyoucef. Continue reading

A Family Affair

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Ayoub Bazarouj

In the spate of raids and arrests following the Friday the 13th attacks in Paris, authorities focused intensely on the Brussels district of Molenbeek-Saint-Jean (Sint-Jans-Molenbeek), with one house receiving special scrutiny.  Police conducted an operation at 47 rue Delaunoy on November 16 beginning at 10:15 in the morning and continuing for over 4 hours.  The reported target was fugitive Salah Abdeslam, but he was not discovered.  One person was brought in according to reports, but authorities stated that it was for administrative purposes and no information was given about who lived at that location [Note: I subsequently discovered an article from LaCapitale.be about a raid on the home of Mohamed Bazarouj, friend of the Abdeslam brothers, on the rue Delaunoy dated November 17]. Continue reading

The “Latest” Sapling

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Sid Ghlam

France has experienced a series of vicious attacks in 2015 provoked by the apocalyptic views of radical Islamist terror groups. The world knows of the attacks on Charlie Hebdo and the recent Friday the 13th attacks in Paris. The world knows very little of Sid Ahmed Ghlam (aka Djillali), who by and large has had only a smattering of press coverage outside of France. Yet his story is very much connected to the others and shows how much of jihadist activity has nothing to do with “lone wolves” but is part of a continuum of teaching and influence that spans generations—a bitter root that defiles many. Continue reading